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The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years is a 2016 documentary film about the Beatles' career during their touring years from 1962 to 1966

 

It was against the law for black people to drink from fountains designated for whites only. This black lady obeys the written message -- ( Screen shot photo)

 

This sign clearly indicates Americas state laws dictatorship directing where black people can and cannot go- - ( Screen shot photo)

 

It was clear where one could relieve themselves as designated what doors women, black and white people could go to the toilet - (Enlarged photo) - ( Screen shot photo)

 

Whoopi Goldberg said, "I never thought of them as white guys. "THEY WERE THE BEATLES, they were colorless!" - ( Screen shot photo)

 

Video Beat - 9-11 WAS A BIG DAY FOR THE BLACK RACE

James Loving - National Radio Text Service

 

 

The Beatles defied racism and got more immediate results than Martin Luther King. As one black lady, then a young girl, described that she was amazed that she was standing in a crowd of white people in a Southern segregated state. She exclaimed that was her first experience attending an event with white people and the Beatles made that happen

 

BEATLES FOUGHT RACISM & WON

Friday August 20, 2021

When most people think about 9-11 the first thing that comes to their mind is the World Trade Center attack by Saudi Arabians. The reality is that to many in the black race 9-11 means something different… to them it means the day the Beatles fought racism for them… and WON.

The other reality is that when many think about the Beatles they think about their incredible music. Ironically not many know them about their fight against racism and they won. This somewhat hidden story is revealed in the film documentary film Eight Days A Week produced by Ron Howard.

The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years is a 2016 documentary film about the Beatles' career during their touring years from 1962 to 1966, from their performances at the Cavern Club in Liverpool to their final concert in San Francisco in 1966.

Prior to playing a concert on September 11, 1964 in Jacksonville, Florida the group was informed that the event would be segregated. The band then informed the promoters that they would not perform under segregated conditions. At that time the Beatles were the biggest attraction in music that hardly toured. For a promoter to lose such an event and payday would be a disaster.

The Beatles defied racism and got more immediate results than Martin Luther King. As one black lady, then a young girl, described that she was amazed that she was standing in a crowd of white people in a Southern segregated state. She exclaimed that was her first experience attending an event with white people and the Beatles made that happen.

The harsh reality is that the 60's were a major turning point in American history. Blacks weren't allowed to attend southern universities, go to the same bathroom as whites and had to ride in the back of a bus.

That scenario is depicted in the life story of blind singer/composer/musician Ray Charles in a film simply titled RAY. Charles dealt with the same problems as any black person in the South and went along with it until he was approached by a black fan in Atlanta that he was not helping black people by performing a concert where blacks weren't allowed or was segregated. Charles later got the message and refused to perform. The promoter then threatened him but Charles held his position.

The difference between the RAY film and the Beatles documentary is just that. The footage in Eight Days A Week is authentic video from their experience as it happened. In the Ray film he was portrayed by Jamie Foxx who did an incredible job but it's simply a film.

The shocking reality of the times is in the Beatles documentary. Given that Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney are the only two of the band still alive, Howard was resourceful in digging up old news footage and video coverage of the band during their tours. In doing so footage and comment from John Lennon and George Harrison are tastefully included.

Think about it this is a depiction of racism that took place 57 years ago and America continues to wallow in this racist cesspool.

When one considers that former NFL professional football player Colin Kaepernick has been banned from playing in the league since 2016 for taking a knee in protest for the enormous amount of black people being murdered by police the Beatles succeeding when equality in the south was forbidden is mindboggling.

Included in the documentary is a segment interviewing now well known black entertainer Whoopi Goldberg. She was a youth she was a big fan of the Beatles. She was questioned why was a black girl a fan of a white group. Goldberg said, "I never thought of them as white guys. "THEY WERE THE BEATLES, they were colorless. I felt like I could be friends with them."

Eight Days a Week is not only a great documentary about the Beatles the segments depicting their fight against racism is telling. For those that see the world in rose colored glasses this is a MUST WATCH as a lesson RACISM and how righteous the Beatles were with their actions.

Aside from this event this documentary is very insightful regarding how impactful the Beatles were in their time. This band made some of the most memorable music ever. As Academy Award composer once mentioned on my TV show songs like the Beatles are EVERGREENS.

In the documentary the Beatles abundant songwriting production have been compared to that of Franz Peter Schubert and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The Beatles talent to write and record so many great hits is unmatched. Paul McCartney estimated that he and John Lennon wrote just short of 300 songs together.

Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years was released theatrically on 15 September 2016 in the United Kingdom and the United States, and started streaming on Hulu on 17 September 2016. It received several awards and nominations, including for Best Documentary at the 70th British Academy Film Awards and the Outstanding Documentary or Nonfiction Special at the 69th Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards.

The film project was announced by Hulu on 4 May 2016 as its first documentary acquisition, as part of a planned Hulu Documentary Films collection. The film premiered theatrically on 15 September, before debuting on the streaming service on 17 September 2016. This film is a MUST WATCH.

 

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